The 4-Step chaperone to publish your research articles

Performing a scientific work not only needs intellectual ability but demands time investment and dedication. After scarifying festive, family time, and a good night’s sleep, the hard-earned work is worth to be published.

  • Be aware of social spam 

One of the examples of misutilisation of technology is the speed of illegitimate and fake journal websites. They lure authors with fake promises of fast and hassle-free publication. We should be aware of fake emails and promotional emails of these fake websites. Rather should search individually by opting for authentic websites such as PubMed, SCOPUS, DOJA, or can even visit the particular journal website if You know the ISSN Number or website details.

Any basic and important query pertaining to APC, word count, review time, and type of article are mentioned with clarity within the reputed journals.

  • Search for high compatibility journals 

Aiming at the best-fit journals means having the utmost clarity not only regarding the objective of the research question but also on the AIM and SCOPE of the selected journal. Your work should sync with the domain of expertise of the journal. At the same time, you should maintain a realistic approach regarding the impact factor and quality of work. The best-fit journal is one that not only is par with your research interest but has less review time, is economical, guidelines are easy to comprehend, the submission process is straightforward and hassle-free, and lastly can positively assess and accommodate your generated work.

  • Clarity on the submission process 

You should have a list of the documents needed while the submission process such as cover letter, title page, highlights, supplementary data, patient consent, Copywrite form, etc. Also the format of submission such as its vial online or email ID based should be accessed before handed. An inventory of the needed document while summiting and password combination should be maintained.

Journals vary in reference formatting, along with a representation of figures and tables within text or as separate images. Journals can ask for American / British English containing manuscripts with a specific font, size, and margin of the doc or Latex file or can have specific template for formatting.

  • Appealing cover letter and Manuscript TITLE 

The cover letter should be written in a polite manner highlighting the gist of the paper. It should also clearly state regarding the authentication of the submitted work, non-submission in multiple journals, authors contribution along with mailing address of the corresponding author.

Similarly, the Title gives the 1st glimpse of the article therefore should be informative but not clumsy, compact, eye-catchy, and original in content.

Writing an Effective Press Release

A press release is a tool made to announce something significantly newsworthy in the most effective way possible. The whole purpose of a press release is to get coverage and get perceived by a target audience.

Regularly optimizing press releases as part of your content marketing efforts can benefit your overall strategy. Their added perk as a marketing tool is that they can generate demand organically, thanks to interest from reporters. The whole idea behind the press release is communication. It can be written, recorded, or even shown – the form doesn’t matter as long as it’s effective.

Writing an effective press release can be an excellent addition to a marketer’s skill-set however, it is actually difficult. Even if you are familiar with web postings or blog writings, the press releases may seem challenging for writing as they come with their own sets of formatting rules, language, and target audience. Moreover, if you familiarize yourself with the basics, then you can be creative.

Structure of a Press Release

  1. The headline of the Press release: Create a catchy headline, add numbers or other distinct elements. Add keywords to the press release heading.
  2. Mention the date and venue
  3. Press contact/Manager info: Name, E-mail, and Phone
  4. Summary Bullet points: Summarize the writing in few key points
  5. Introduction paragraph: Concise the background information
  6. Detail paragraph: Discuss the event/project.
  7. Closing statement: Conclude the meeting.

The ideal length of a press release is a single A4 side page or about 300 to 400 words (the length of a short news item). That’s just 3-4 short paragraphs and a couple of quotes. Remove the unnecessary waffle that doesn’t add anything to the story. Don’t be tempted to include background information about your company in the opening paragraph. Write a press release by keeping a target audience in mind. However, the press release is not written directly for the target audience, it is written for the editor/journalist/broadcaster and then they tailor it to the readership/viewers/listeners of that publication/program.

To write an effective press release, answer the following questions:

  1. Who? Who are the key players – your company, anyone else involved with the product? Who does your news affect/who does it benefit?
  2. What? What is new?
  3. Why? Why is this news important – what does it tell people that they need to know?
  4. Where? Where is this happening?
  5. When? What is the timing of this? Does this add significance?
  6. How? How did this come about?

In conclusion, the following should be considered to write an effective press release:

(1) Writing a short, catchy headline, (2) Get to the Point –summarize your subject in the first paragraph, (3) Body – explain why this matter to your audience, and (4) Closing statement.

Tools to help scientists in writing more effectively and efficiently

Writing tools are new generation software that auto-correct mistakes incurred while penning scientific content so as u write hassle-free with the least focus on the rule of grammars. Improvisation of digital technology in conjugation to scientific writing has led to effective project and time management.

  • PHRASE BANK

This utility app provides a database of numerous phrases that can become a part of project work, thesis, dissertation, and also manuscript. It is developed by The University Language Center of Manchester University.

  • THESAURUS.COM

The synonyms play an important role in effective writing, as it’s an easy replacement of a “not so-so word” with a more catchy and refined one, thereby driving the needed attention of the reader. The need for synonyms is more profound in the case of scientific content as it gives the desired richness to the content and assists the inflow of information in the manuscript. Therasus.com has a wide collection of synonyms and also highlights its relevance in terms of usage in a user-friendly format and thereby helps users to select appropriate “scientifically inclined English “rather than just English literature appropriate words.

  • ZERO TO

It makes references and bibliography instantly in word, Google Docs. Zero to can make a repository of search items with keywords and can retrieve them in an appropriate place in the document while writing. You can also sync your file, document in Zero to and can retrieve it any time.

  • TRELLO

It’s a project management app. Trello has a board, list, and cards which together assist in managing tasks, meeting the timeline, checklist, and reporting among members in the project.

  • GRAMMARLY

It is Google-derived writing assistance in spelling and grammar that can conjugate with any browser window. It underlines the mistakes in red color and suggests the corrections.

  • AUTHOR

It can undertake live chats during writing sessions and provide an opportunity for the authors to edit the contents of the manuscript in real-time. The Manuscript or parts of it in the form of tables, figures all can be in one platform and hence provides an opportunity for collaborative writing. Documents can be submitted from latex and word and can be exported as latex, word, and PDF documents.

  • OTTER

It’s a transcription-based app that helps researchers to record their ideas. It provided recording for the English language.

  • TODOIST

It assists as a schema to manage or organize the project in your browser. It helps in scheduling tasks on daily basis and can keep a track of assignments to be done in the coming 7 days.

  • LINGUEE

It’s an online dictionary and can translate from 20 different languages to English. It’s a needed tool for non-native English users.

  • FEEDLY

This app keeps us updated regarding the latest development in science. It is a platform that provides a collection of all upcoming publications and blogs based on your interest.

  • SLACK

It can be used as a lab confined chatting platform to discuss or share important information among the members. It saves time utilized in writing an email and creates a scientific chat group to exchanges files among the users.

  • Apps for focus retention

Scientific writing demands enormous dedication and a focused approach as we say a bull’s-eye. Apps such as Forest, Focusmate, and cold Turkey provided the desired attention by filtering the distractors.

  • Cold turkey shuts down other background software and transforms the computer into a typewriter. You can decide whether u want to keep distraction at bay for a particular time period or till a certain word count has been achieved.
  • Focus mate is a virtual “social co-working platform” wherein you work aside from your focus mate silently for a predefined time frame, and are really not connected with the person except that u share your webcam or maybe a greeting at the beginning of the session.

 

The scientific content writing App provides the needed assistance in the context of grammar, arrangement of content, project management, sharing of ideas among team members and even helps us to keep updated with the new interventions in the field of science and technology.

Medical Grant Proposal Writing

What is a Grant Proposal Writing?

A Grant Proposal Writing is a document or collection of documents submitted to an agency for the express purpose of obtaining funding for a research project. Successful grant applications are the result of a lengthy process that starts with an idea. Grant Proposal Writing is a circular process, although many people think of it as a linear process (from concept to proposal to award).

What are the Steps in Grant Proposal Writing?

Formulate a Research Question

Many people begin by formulating a research proposal. This is simpler if you know what you want to accomplish before you start writing.

  • As a direct result of your project, what expertise or information would you gain?
  • What is the significance of your study in a wider sense?
  • You must make this aim clear to the committee that will be evaluating your application.

 

Define a Goal

  • You must first determine what type of research you will conduct and why before you begin writing your proposal.
  • Even if you already have a subject or experiment in mind, taking the time to define what your end goal is will help you persuade others to support your project.
  • What exactly are you up to, and why are you up to it? Give a reason for your decision.
  • Feel free to show some initiative and tackle a dilemma, just make sure you can justify why and then persuade us that you have a good chance of succeeding.
  • Demonstrate the approach’s uniqueness by presenting the information void that needs to be filled.

 

Find Funding Agencies

  • Whether or not your plan is funded is largely determined by how well your intent and objectives align with the priorities of awarding agencies.
  • Locating potential grantors is a time-consuming process, but it will pay off in the long run.
  • Even if you have the most compelling research idea in the world, if you don’t submit it to the right institutions, you’re unlikely to be considered for funding.
  • There are a plethora of resources available to learn more about granting agencies and grant programs.
  • Most colleges, as well as several schools within universities, have research offices whose primary function is to assist faculty and students with grant applications.
  • To assist people with finding potential grants, these offices typically have libraries or resource centers.

 

Do Internal Review

  • Seek the advice of a mentor or a senior colleague for a second opinion. Remember to check the following things –
  • Title
  • Introduction about the Medical Research
  • Problems in the Medical Research
  • Objectives
  • Preliminary Literature Review
  • Research Methodologies
  • Research Plan
  • Make a Budget Plan
  • Reference

 

Plan your Budget

  • Your proposal must be presented to the funding body as a successful cash reward.
  • There must be a strategy for every aspect of the mission.
  • Analysts will go over it carefully to ensure that the study’s components are affordable.
  • Your application can be executed due to over-costing.
  • Consider if the advancement you can make in the field justifies the expense.

 

Conclusion

Before writing a Research Protocol, identification of Sponsors and Understanding Application Guidelines is vital. Many companies are providing professional grant writing services.

Medical Writing As a Career

Some of the most rewarding career paths are ones that people never intended to take. This is frequently the case for medical writers who did not consider this flourishing field when they began their careers. Medical writing may be an organic change for people with a medical, life science, or academic background seeking to move away from the lab or healthcare institutions because there are no clear qualifications. Passionate writers will find a rewarding career in this inspiring and unique field. Medical writing is in high demand in the communication, healthcare, and pharmaceutical industries.

What Is Medical Writing?

Medical Writing is communicating Clinical & Scientific Data clearly and effectively.

Scope of Medical Writing

  • Clinical Research Documentation
  • Content Writer for Health Care
  • Article writing for Healthcare Magazines and Journals

 

Types of Medical Writing

Medical Writing is mainly of two types:

Regulatory and Research Related Writing

  • Focused mostly on Medical & Pharmaceutical Industries.
  • The main audiences are people performing Clinical Trials, Government Regulatory Authorities.
  • The objective is to attain and maintain marketing authorization for new drugs, therapies, medical devices, and other health products.

 

Medical Communications

  • Documents about New Drugs, Therapies, Medical Devices, or other health products.
  • Examples are Scientific Manuscripts, Product Monographs, Conference Abstracts, Posters, Educational Material.

 

What are the Skills Needed to be a Medical Writer?

  • Domain Knowledge – Health Care Knowledge
  • Data Integrity – Data Analysis
  • Clarity – Communication Expertise
  • Language Skills – Scientific Expertise
  • Follow Ethical Standards
  • Knowledge about Legal Concerns
  • Good Writing Skills
  • Literature / Reference Search – Document Review Process
  • Interpretation & Presentation – Document Expertise
  • Formatting & Editing
  • Reviewing Published Paper

 

Courses for Medical Writing

Some of the Medical Writing Certification Courses are as follows:

  • PG Diploma in Medical Writing – 12 Months
  • Professional Diploma in Medical Writing – 4 to 6 Months (Online)
  • Advanced PG Diploma in Clinical Research & Writing – 6 to 8 Months
  • Certificate Program in Medical Writing – 6 Months
  • Free Courses

 

Job Titles for Medical Writers

  • Medical Expert
  • Editorial Manager
  • Senior Writer
  • Associate Writer
  • Junior Writer

 

Roles of Medical Writers

  • Proofreads regulatory documents and clinical documents.
  • Coordinates with Medical professionals.
  • Helps to write research articles.
  • Creates Educational and Informational materials for the Medical kits.
  • Writes Research Findings
  • Creates Standard Operating Procedures for Medical company’s planning

 

Where do Medical Writers work?

  • Pharmaceutical Sector
  • Medical Communication Agencies
  • Contract Research Organization
  • Journal Publishing
  • Biotechnology Sector
  • Medical Device Sector
  • Medical Translations
  • Other (Academic) Sectors

 

Benefits of being a Medical Writer

  • Challenging & Stimulating Work ENVIRONMENT
  • Always learning new things
  • Satisfaction in being an important part of a team
  • Lead groups of Multifunctional Professionals
  • Opportunities to travel

 

Conclusion

Medical Writers do Scientific Documentation. Medical Writing involves the above-mentioned skills and offers a good career. People with medical knowledge and writing skills would have a lot of opportunities.

What Are The Major Reasons For Scientific Manuscript Rejection?

Research paper writing is a specialized skill that all academicians have to learn. While publication is an essential part of the profession, the rates of rejection by journals are too high. Estimates suggest that for highly regarded journals like Cell, Nature, and Science, the rejection rate is as high as 97%! That is to say, of all the 100 submissions, only 3 make it through editorial and peer review scrutiny, and this is for top professionals of their fields! Therefore, it is critical that authors are aware of the reasons for rejection in order to avoid the same.

Top reasons for rejection:

Editorial reasons for Rejection

Mismatched scope: Each journal has a well-defined aim and scope, focusing on some specific area of the field. Often, authors share manuscripts with reputed journals for publication without actually checking if their article matches the journal objectives. It is best to check the scope of the journal before sharing the original manuscript; you may simply write to the editor to enquire if they are interested in an article on the topic you have written on.

Quality of writing: Many times, editors reject articles at the initial screening simply because of poor language. Journals have their own set of writing guidelines, including referencing style, font, etc. Any submission not fulfilling these conditions are automatically rejected. Poor language is another pet peeve of most editors, as is plagiarized content.

Value addition: Editors look for articles that add value to their journals. Often editors will reject articles that they find to be extensions of an earlier publication by the same author, the article has no archival value or adds little to the ongoing discourse.

Technical Reasons for Rejection

The structure: Most articles need to have a basic structure, starting with an introduction, followed by a literature review, methodology, etc. For empirical studies, the methodology, data reporting, etc. have to follow well-established protocols. Failure to adhere to accepted structures will lead to rejection.

Poor data work: Poor or insufficient data work is often the biggest bane. Journals will reject articles if they feel the hypothesis is unclear, data collection and analysis is insufficient or does not measure up to industry standards, poor or insufficient analytical tools, inconclusive data leading to speculation, especially in the conclusion. You need to have clarity on whether you need to undertake parametric or non-parametric tests for your data, whether the sample size is good enough to draw conclusions, whether the proper statistical checks and measures are adhered to, etc.

Poor referencing: Referencing is critical for an original submission, as it is directly linked to the problem of plagiarism. You must ensure that all your sources are duly referred to, and that too in the format specified by the journal. Often, journals will also reject articles if your references have dated articles and they feel you are not updated on the subject, or you are referring to the same article multiple times over the article.

It is advised to be acutely aware of these factors in advance before even drafting the original manuscript for submission.

Plagiarism in Academic writing: How to Identify and Avoid It

Plagiarism is well-known as a breach of publishing ethics which is despised in the academic circle. However, while in some cases the authors engage in deliberate plagiarism, more often than not authors end up being guilty of plagiarism unknowingly. This is because plagiarism, although a very commonly used term, is a vaguely defined concept.

Plagiarism technically means using someone else’s ideas/ intellectual property as one’s own without giving proper credit to the original creator. While the first part (as one’s own) is well understood as improper appropriation, it is often the second part (giving proper credit) where author’s unintentionally falter. 

Some of the most common forms of plagiarism are:

Patchwork: patchwork refers to direct lifting or verbatim representation of another’s work without using quotations or referencing. This is the most blatant form of plagiarism.

Plagiarised ideas: This is when you pass-off someone else’s ideas as your own, even if in your own words or articulation.

Loose paraphrasing: This is the most common form of unintentional plagiarism. Authors, while discussing literature reviews, often write the content of other authors without proper attribution, which technically makes it plagiarism.

Self-plagiarism: This is the most difficult to understand the form of plagiarism. This refers to recycling of one’s own work in multiple publications. While it is difficult to comprehend how one can ‘steal’ from oneself, reproduction of the same work in multiple journal publications or presenting the same content multiple times to bolster the number of one’s publications is a problem in academics that has led to this publishing ethics.

How to avoid unintentional plagiarism:

Proper referencing: while doing your background research, keep meticulous notes of which ideas/sections are from which article. While writing, maintain side notes for proper referencing later while finalizing the article.

Quotes and paraphrasing: authors often tangle themselves up in this issue! For citing what some other author has said, it is advisable to use quotations to drive home a critical or technical detail. While discussing a concept and how others have addressed it, it is better to paraphrase it in one’s own words.

While paraphrasing, one must be careful not to reproduce the same content by just replacing certain words here and there. A proper paraphrasing would be a complete re-articulation of the source material. Proper paraphrasing is rewriting other’s content from one’s own perspective.

In both cases, proper citation or reference is mandatory.

Follow citation rules: every journal has well-defined citation and referencing norms and one must follow them judiciously. Journals nowadays prefer in-text referencing, especially for paraphrasing and quotations and it is a good habit to develop one’s writing style with in-text referencing.

Rewrite your own words: while referring to your own previous works, we often tend to copy-paste paragraphs as one likes one’s own articulation best. However, in order to avoid self-plagiarism, rewrite the content every time for a new article in the context of the new article, and you will see your language will change.

HELPFUL TIPS FOR WRITING PHILOSOPHICAL PAPERS

Philosophical writings are very difficult and vary greatly from writing exercises in other disciplines. Writing a good philosophical paper is both a challenge and a treat, and is perhaps the greatest test of one’s logical reasoning skills and articulation skills. Here are some key points to remember while writing a philosophical paper.

The approach to philosophical writing is quite different from writing in most other subjects. That is because it is neither a research paper based on empirical analysis nor an exercise in literary self-expression which can be an articulation of subjective expressions. It is also not a simple literature review of what various scholars have had to say on a particular topic. Most importantly, it is not to present your personal feelings or impressions.

However, at the same time, philosophical writing is about defending a thesis or hypothesis. Thus, it needs the same rigor in establishing an argument, developing a hypothesis, and then logically defending one’s hypothesis. Arguments lie at the core of philosophical writing, and they are rarely simple arguments. Instead, they often are large, complicated, and sophisticated treatments of fundamental problems or abstract questions in which logical reasoning must be the guiding principle to arrive at logically sound conclusions.

The main trick to writing a good philosophical paper is maintaining focus, being consistent, and clarity in thought and articulation. Philosophy papers usually involve both ‘exposition’ and ‘evaluation’.  In course of exposition, you explain the view or argument under consideration and the views of other thinkers who have worked on this subject.  The evaluation part of the paper is your chance to do some ‘philosophy’ of your own, where you engage with the central question with ‘rational persuasion’.

The key to a well-articulated paper is a logical organization. Logical organization refers not only to one’s arguments but also for planning out the paper. An effective structure requires carefully developed paragraphs and sections, where every paragraph or section must be self-explanatory, continuing a strand of discussion from the previous one and logically leading to the next. The style must be precise, consistent, and focussed. It is suggested to break down sentences that are excessively long and convoluted or paragraph too packed with details and rapid turns of thought, as it creates challenges for readers to digest complex information.

It is critical to have the consistency of terminologies, especially technical ones. Using synonyms is a slippery slope as each has different connotations. Use specialize terminologies used by philosophers whose arguments you are considering, define each one extremely carefully, use it with consistency in your own arguments, providing explanations of even subtle differences in the ways in which different philosophers use it, and more importantly how you interpret it.

Lastly, do not fall prey to the temptation of name dropping or lengthy quotes. Even if you find a heavyweight philosopher who is a kindred soul, your paper should rely on your arguments and not what your fellow thinker has said! Formulate your arguments and articulate them well to establish your credentials as an expert in philosophical writing.

Tips for writing a pharmaceutical research grant

Applying for research grants is a critical part of any young researcher. Each field has its own specifications, and the pharmaceutical research proposal requires a certain focus. The research proposal must establish a strong fundamental understanding of developing pharmaceutical study design/protocol and communicating it successfully to the Grant agencies.

Tips for drafting a proposal for a pharmaceutical research grant:

Preparation: Putting together a proposal itself can take a considerable time. You should focus on writing a research proposal; background preparation, establish a strong team around you, make a contingency plan for applying to several grants. If the grant is received, the entire project would be long and require a considerable time commitment from every team member.

The Research Topic: Critical thinking is the key to win a grant, and it must be reflected in each stage of the research proposal, starting with the topic of choice. Identify which field of study the grant focuses on and whether you have the competency to work on such a field. Your topic must pose a worthwhile question that needs to be answered and must offer tangible benefits within a reasonable and defined period. Concepts should not be too ambitious and lack of proof and low impact may be a deal-breaker.

Innovation: Research grants are competition, and the key differentiator is innovative research. The research proposal must have creative research ideas in the form of novel concepts, approaches, and methodology to be adopted, and the possible results promised. The hypotheses proposed must be testable and measurable by the proposed methods, and predictions must reflect the critical thinking that goes behind the research.

The research plan: any research grant is a fixed monetary commitment for a specified period. Therefore, any research proposal must have a definitive research plan, including timelines, deliverables, and a budgetary outlay justifying the grant money. Reviewers may recommend budget cuts if they think the expenses are too high or unjustified. You should demonstrate that you will manage the award well and emphasize how you will control the finances within the timeline and committed deliverables. The budget must accurately reflect the plan for data collection, data analysis, and data write up and give breakup for each head like personnel, infrastructure, overhead costs, material expenses, etc.

Review: writing for a pharmaceutical research grant successfully requires expertise and experience. Each proposal has to follow certain formats as mandated by each granting agency. Such formats often have strict word limits and predetermined reporting structures. You must be very careful to follow the instructions meticulously. It is best to consult your peers/ seniors/ or fellow colleagues to review the proposal. A review not only helps check if the proposal meets the format but also helps ensure the actual message is strongly communicated even in that limited structure.

Mastering the three stages of manuscript editing

Editing your own creative work could sometimes seem intimidating, mainly because looking at your own work with a critical eye is not as easy as it seems. It’s not just about spelling and grammar. Editing is a skill that sometimes requires you to get rid of even your most favorite terms and terminologies. To be a great editor, you would have to detach yourself from your own script and get acquainted with the ‘backspace’ button.

Here are the three stages of manuscript writing:

Content or Substantive Edit

This is the most time-consuming part of manuscript editing. Remember, there is always a better way to present your manuscript. Start by giving yourself some time away from your script so that you can develop a fresh take on what you’ve written. The focus of your editing exercise this time should be on the structural aspect, and you would need to pay attention to what works well and what looks awry. Revisit your overall paper at least three times, pay attention to the text, data, accuracy, and overall consistency and presentation. A professional subject matter editor always takes care of the content issues to make sure your writing is ready to be submitted for publication.

Copy Edit  

Once you have dealt with the structural errors by making the necessary revisions, it’s time to copy edit your paper to ensure correct formatting, grammar, margins, font size, etc. This includes all things technical and presentation-based. Copy editing requires you to pay attention to the tone, language, phrasing, parts of the speech, undue repetitions, etc. A copy edit makes your work free of any technical errors that might be a hindrance at the acceptance stage in the publication cycle. It is indeed a skill, and good copy-editing includes eliminating any wordiness in order to improve readability. Even though copy editing does not take as much time as a content edit, you would still be required to give a good amount of your time to this.

Proofreading  

Proofreading is the third stage in editing your manuscript. Unlike copy edit and content edit, this stage requires you to separate your text into sections, and concentrate on one section at a time. You can consider printing a hard copy if reading online is a problem. By now, you must have clearly understood the focus of the overall paper; therefore at this stage, you must examine each sentence individually for syntax, spelling, and grammar. You should recheck any dates, data, names of people, places, etc. that you have mentioned in the text to ensure accuracy.

Conclusion

We live in a world of technology, and a lot of things become easier with the resources available online. To support your manuscript editing skill, do not hesitate to refer to online applications or websites that might come handy to do minor language, spelling, and phrasing edits. Also, it is advisable to let peers re-read your scripts before starting the edit to incorporate third-party suggestions.