Importance of quality content in SCOPUS

Publication in a reputed, high-impact indexed journal is the primary metric for a researcher. However, selecting the right journal can be a complex task. Researchers need to optimize between different criteria before reaching a decision. The journal selection process involves different factors: identifying the scope of the journal, impact factor, the reputation of the journal, specific indexing, issue release periodicity, and open access fee/publication fee.

SCOPUS indexing and content curation

SCOPUS indexing SCOPUS is one of the largest indexing databases for journals and books in the medical and life sciences field. Advantages of publication in SCOPUS indexed journals include: increase in the visibility of your publication(s), peer-review process, reaches global audiences.

SCOPUS is the most recommended database as the researchers can effortlessly find relevant and trusted research and access data that can help them to select the most appropriate journal for their research paper.

The research publication industry has seen a signification growth and almost everyday new journal is being launched. Hence, there is a necessity to identify and eliminate poor-performing and predatory journals from the list while selecting the right journal for publication.

SCOPUS is a database of journals that includes only the reputed, good performing, high-impact, and peer-reviewed journals.

The journals or publishers added to the SCOPUS list undergo a rigorous evaluation process by the subject experts of the Content Selection and Advisory Board (CSAB). The board determines the eligibility of the title and removes poor-performing and predatory journals.  The board along with the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) decides whether to include a new journal, discontinue an indexed journal, or continue with a journal.

SCOPUS and the CSAB ensure that the users get the best possible evidence for their work and only reliable journals and their content is available to the researchers.

Re-evaluation criteria

In addition to the selection criteria, there is continuous monitoring and re-evaluation process which ensures that the quality of the indexed journals should be maintained.

There are 4 criteria that are considered for re-evaluation of an indexed journal:

  1. Poor performance
  2. Doubt about peer-review process or publication standards
  3. Data curation
  4. Data metrics (periodicity, number of original articles, diversity, novelty, etc.)

Poor performance of the journals

The underperformance of a journal is determined by analyzing three metrics:

  1. Self-citation rate (Higher self-citations)
  2. Total citation rate (Fewer citations)
  3. CiteScore (Lower CiteScore compared to other peer-reviewed journals)

In conclusion, the information or data provided by the SCOPUS are highly recommended and hence, there is a necessity from this indexing end to provide reliable content, include reputed journals (exclude predatorily), and update the database regularly.