Groundwater is now a ticking time bomb

Future generations will face a ticking environmental “time bomb” as the world’s groundwater systems take years to act in response to the present day impact of climate change. More than two billion people rely on it to drink or irrigate crops. It slowly revives through rainfall but a dry climate or draught threatens the available source of water. Population explosion is also a contributing factor. The planet takes time to adjust to the ever-changing planet. Climate change, Heating of the planet is affecting the natural resource.

Reference: https://www.ndtv.com/science/scientists-warn-of-climate-time-bomb-for-worlds-groundwater-1981163

Editors at Elsevier Journal quit, started a rival open-access journal

The entire board of the Elsevier-owned Journal of Informetrics surrendered on Thursday to protest over high open-access fees, confining access to data and information commercial control of academic work.

Today, a similar group is launching a new fully open-access journal called Quantitative Science Studies. The journal will be for and by the academic community and will be owned by the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI). It will be distributed mutually with MIT Press.

Reference: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/01/14/elsevier-journal-editors-resign-start-rival-open-access-journal

Elsevier authorize the Researchers to access its pay walled journals

The conflict between Elsevier, the world’s biggest publisher of scientific journals, and Germany’s entire university system has dragged on since 2015. However, recently Elsevier has approved continuous access to its paywalled journals for researchers at around 200 German universities and other research institutes that had refused earlier to renew their individual subscriptions. The nationwide deal sought by scientists includes an open-access option, under which all corresponding authors affiliated with German institutions would be allowed to make their papers open to read and share by anyone in the world. This would be a signpost for global efforts to make the results of publicly funded research immediately and freely available to scientists.

Cambridge University Press accepts Open Access agreement

Cambridge University Press has reached a major Open Access contract with higher education and research institutions in Sweden. The three-year ‘read and publish’ deal has agreed with Bibsam – an association of 85 higher education and research institutions, led by the National Library of Sweden. It indicates that the authors from institutions affiliated to Bibsam can publish their publicly-financed research articles in the Press’s hybrid and fully Open Access journals. It also gives Bibsam members full access to the Press’ full collection of nearly 400 journals from 1 January 2019.

Reference:http://www.stm-publishing.com/cambridge-university-press-signs-major-open-access-deal-in-sweden/

AI peer reviewers smoothen the publishing grind

Peer review by artificial intelligence (AI) is promising to improve the process, enhance the quality of published papers — and save reviewers time. A handful of academic publishers are driving AI tools to do anything from selecting reviewers to checking statistics and summarizing a paper’s findings. In June, software called StatReviewer adopted by Aries Systems verifies the statistics and methods used in the manuscripts. ScholarOne, another peer-review platform is teaming up with UNSILO of Aarhus, Denmark, which uses natural language processing and machine learning to analyze manuscripts. UNSILO automatically pulls out key concepts to summarize what the paper is about. These tools can make sure a manuscript is up to scratch, but in no way are they replacing what a reviewer would do in terms of evaluation.

Reference Link : https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-07245-9

Journal for “controversial ideas” to be launched next year

A “controversial ideas” journal where researchers can publish articles under pseudonyms will be launched next year by an Oxford University academic. The new journal is a response to a rise in researchers being criticised and silenced by those who disagree with them, according to Jeff McMahan, a professor of moral philosophy at Oxford.

Reference Link: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2018/11/12/controversial-ideas-journal-academics-can-publish-pseudonyms/

Diversified journal guidelines confuse Scientists

A global study of 7000 researchers suggests that unclear publishing policies place an extra burden on scientists who don’t speak English as their first language. A significant proportion of respondents revealed that preparing manuscripts for English-language journals is the most challenging step in the publication process. A considerable percentage even did not have a solid understanding of some aspects of publication ethics or were not familiar with standard ethics-related guidelines and bodies. The publishing industry should work on how to minimize the additional burden on authors.

AI and scientific literature work in sync

When scholars choose a topic to work on their research, they need more sources or materials to review literature and add more value to their findings. According to Canadian science publishing’s article from last year, 2.5 million research papers are published annually while another unidentified source suggests that new researches are published around the world; approximately 1 million each year! Which is equal to one every 30 seconds. With the overload of new papers in each field and more growing every year it is practically impossible for scholars to keep with the information that is put out in each paper. Christian Berger’s team from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, found a staggering number of papers on the subject; more than 10,000 in the same subject. Fortunately, the team had the support of an AI system, a writing investigation tool called Iris.ai.

Iris.ai is an AI, a tool developed for scholars to make writing research papers easier. It is a Berlin-based company that claims to save 90% of time with 85% precision of data matching, has more than 70 m open access papers. Iris.ai is programmed to learn about the topic provided and perform an elaborate frequency analysis over the text. Then it read the words for which it needs to find results and additional material that could be helpful for the paper. It uses a 500-word description of the researcher’s issue, or the link of their paper and the AI restores a guide to thousands of coordinating reports. As the website suggests, it is a scientific writing assistant.

According to Berger, it was “a quick and nevertheless precise overview of what should be relevant to a certain research question”. Iris.ai is one among many of the new AI-based tools offering targeted results of the knowledge landscape. One such tool is called Semantic Scholar, produced by the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Seattle, Washington, and Microsoft Academic.

Although every instrument is different from each other and gives different output, they all provide researchers with a different look at the scientific literature than conventional tools such as PubMed and Google Scholar. Semantic Scholar is a browser-based search tool that mimics the engines like Google and it is free. But it is more informative than Google Scholar in terms of specific results required by researchers. Doug Raymond, Semantic Scholar’s general manager, says that one million individuals utilize their service every month. It uses natural language processing or NLP to extract data while building connections to determine if the information is relevant and reputable or not.

Artificial intelligence is saving a lot of time and making it easier and quicker to automate some procedures. In the academic publishing industry, the Al-based innovations are being produced and implemented to help both authors and publishers for peer reviews, searching published content, detecting plagiarism, and identifying data fabrication. AI could be costly, but it can accelerate a researchers’ access to new fields. More and more such AI tools are being developed to cater to various requisites of writing a paper, such as filtering topics for relevance, keyword search, etc.

Experts who need more assistance for their specific concerns might consider free Al­ tool such as Microsoft Academic or Semantic Scholar. While AI is easing so many burdens and saving time for a researcher, let’s not forget that it is still machine intelligence and may require human intervention here and there to make a paper more presentable and precise.

Wiley and Hindawi increase their open access publishing partnership

With Open Access turning into the shared vision of various governments worldwide and a specific concentration inside some European research funders, this extended joint effort permits both Wiley and Hindawi to help the continuous improvement of top-notch open access titles and giving creators extra choices for where and how to publish. This collaboration is an extraordinary case of how Open Access is an intense and powerful driving force of the Open Science landscape, supporting an open and energizing worldwide space of sharing and associating the effect of research for the future generations.

Reference link: http://www.stm-publishing.com/wiley-and-hindawi-expand-open-access-publishing-collaboration/