Australia is in double bind over ‘treason’ laws

According to experts’ assumptions there could be a fall in the number of Chinese students studying at Australian Universities on account of new anti-treason laws that have been portrayed as “anti-China” by the China’s Communist Party and state-governed media. Last month Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, declared a series of planned laws to limit foreign influence in Australian politics. They are in a dilemma as they want to protect academic freedom at the same time they want to retain Chinese student numbers.

Reference Link: https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/australia-fears-decline-chinese-students-over-treason-laws

Wiley declares launch of Wiley Digital Archives

 John Wiley and Sons Inc. have introduced a new program of digital primary sources that provides first-time access to rare historical records across the sciences and medicine.  Wiley Digital Archives is going to be launched this year. It has made the process effortless for institutional customers; they can procure digital access to unique historical primary sources, digitized from leading societies such as the New York Academy of Sciences and the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland.

Reference Link: http://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/all-corporate-news/wiley-announces-launch-wiley-digital-archives

Dimensions database provides new ways to explore scholarly literature

The marketplace for science search engines is cut-throat and crowded. Dimensions database has been launched on January 15, which intends to provide new methods to academics to analyse the scholarly literature. It has assured to grant fund on scholarly literature which includes indexing papers and their citations and connecting publications to their related grants, funding agencies, patents and clinical trials. The tool was created by London-based technology firm Digital Science which is operated by the Holtzbrinck Publishing Group; it holds a majority share in Nature’s publisher.

Reference Link: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-00688-0

Things to avoid to frame a good research paper title

Drafting a good research paper title needs serious thought. Researchers focus so much on their research findings that they tend to forget the important role played by the title of their paper. Though it seems a simple task, in reality the process of choosing a suitable title demands consistent thinking and attention. This step is a critical one because readers will search online and through databases and bibliographies based on the title. Therefore, it is imperative that you have a title that can drive your targeted audience/readers to your research paper. An interesting research topic combined with an accurate title will definitely draw more attention to your work from peers and the public.

There are many pre-set criteria that help researchers write a perfect research paper title. But it would also be helpful to have a list of what should never go into the title of a journal article. The following list can act as a useful reckoner about what to avoid in your research title in order to increase the impact of your research.

A Handy List of Don’ts

  • The period is generally not used in a title (even a declarative phrase can work without a period)
  • Any type of dashes to separate title elements or hyphens to link words is allowed.
  • Chemical formulae should be noted in their generic or common names. For example H2O, CH4, etc should be avoided.
  • The title should not include roman numerals (e.g., III, IX, etc.).
  • Try not to include semi-colons; however, the colon can be used to make two-part titles.
  • The taxonomic hierarchy of species of plants, animals, fungi, etc. is not needed.
  • Abbreviations confuse readers, so they should be avoided (except for RNA, DNA which is standard now and widely known).
  • Initials and acronyms should not be included as they create confusion. (e.g., “Ca” may get confused with CA, which denotes cancer).
  • It’s good to avoid query marks as they probably decrease the number of citations, but a query mark is useful in economics and philosophy papers or when the findings are undecided).
  • Too many offbeat words can influence the Altmetric Attention Score; using common words is better.
  • Avoid using numerical exponents or units (e.g. km-1 or km/hr).
  • Phrases should be direct and factual (e.g., “with” could be rewritten with the more specific verb “amongst”).
  • Complex drug names should be avoided (use the generic name if allowed to).
  • Do not include obvious or non-specific openings with a conjunction (e.g., “Report on,” “A Study of,” “Results of,” “An Experimental Investigation of,” etc. because they don’t contribute any meaning).
  • Italicize only species names of studied organisms.
  • Avoid using shortened scientific names (write Escherichia coli and not coli).
  • Try to wrap the title within 50 to 100 characters as shorter titles are cited more often.

These steps would help a researcher to form an effective and relevant title for their research paper. A title should be interesting predicts the content of the research paper and also reflect the tone of the writing.

Predatory journal has firm grip on universities in Ottawa and Canada

Scientists from the University of Ottawa, the Ottawa Hospital and other renowned institutions across Canada have been publishing their findings in fake science journals, spoiling the work despite years of warnings. One veteran science publisher warns all the work that produced these studies “is just thrown away.” Until recently, the scope of the problem of “predatory” journals has been hard to measure. Now, a known name in the fake publishing field, OMICS International of India, has enhanced the search engine for 700 journals. As a result, we found hundreds of Canadian scientists publishing recently with the Indian firm — the same company that has accepted the newspaper’s analysis of how pigs fly.

Reference Lin: http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20180113063351529

More than half of UK-authored research articles are made accessible

According to the report commissioned by Universities UK Open Access Coordination Group the share of UK research which is freely available is increasing at a considerable rate. 37% of UK outputs are available via open access to public view either through Gold or Green OA within 12 months. The trend of UK-authored articles published open access went up from 12% in 2012 to 30% in 2016, an annual growth rate of over 30% sustained throughout the period.

Reference Link: http://www.stm-publishing.com/37-of-uk-research-outputs-freely-available-immediately-at-the-time-of-publication-says-new-report/

AIP Publishing removes the charges obstacle

AIP Publishing declared to remove publication page charges and color charges from all organisation’s’ journals on effect from January 1, 2018. The journals include Physics of Plasmas, Review of Scientific Instruments, and 10 other well-known peer-reviewed physical science titles. This initiative is taken to eliminate the charges barriers and facilitate emerging shifts in scholarly communication.

Reference: http://www.stm-publishing.com/aip-publishing-eliminates-publication-page-charges-across-all-journals/?wt=3

De Gruyter and United Nations participate for free-available book project

De Gruyter and United Nations mutually decide to work on publication of two open access books on mathematics. The books are authored for physicists and engineers and will serve as the foundation mathematics course under the syllabus of the Regional Centres. Both books are accessible to everyone and from everywhere. The first volume includes Linear Algebra and the second volume focuses on Probability and Statistics.

Reference Link: http://www.stm-publishing.com/de-gruyter-and-united-nations-cooperate-on-open-access-book-project/

Sugar craving increases by short sleep

A recent study has discovered that sugar cravings increases by lack of sleep and following and maintaining a good diet to maintain healthy weight would necessitate a good night’s rest. The researchers of King’s College, London, conducted a study on 42 healthy adults. They were divided into two groups and one of the groups was trained to follow good sleeping practices and the other group was not advised to follow any rule. A motion sensor was used by these persons during the week to record the data of test.

After one week, the researchers found that heavy sleepers tend to consume less sugar than short sleepers. The aim of this study is to strengthen the findings that improving sleep improves diet and health of a person.

Ref: https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180111/Sugar-cravings-worsened-by-lack-of-sleep.aspx