Future Science Group opens a new journal – Future Drug Discovery

Future Drug Discovery is a peer-reviewed, open access journal covering the latest breakthrough science in drug discovery, research & development. Future Drug Discovery aims to harness high failure rates, presenting new advances and discussing their applications and translation in an openly accessible format, and providing a forum for discussing the field at large. It will be a quarterly publication publishing case histories, methodologies, original research, reviews and opinion articles covering the entire drug discovery pipeline, plus topics of interest to the drug discovery community. A comprehensive list of topics can be found at the journal webpage.

Reference Link: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-03/fsg-fsg032619.php

Big pharma cuddles open-access publishers

According to a study, scientists from pharmaceutical trade publish a higher fraction of their papers open access than academics who aren’t in industry. The open-access papers published by 23 large drug companies, such as Pfizer and Roche has overtaken the quantity of liberally available papers published most prominently in medicine-related fields.“It seems like big pharma has a notable niche in open access,” says Kyle Siler, a social scientist at Utrecht University in the Netherlands.

UC terminates negotiation with publishing giant Elsevier

As a leader in the universal movement toward open access to publicly funded research, the University of California terminated its further subscriptions with Elsevier, the world’s largest scientific publisher. Despite months of bond negotiations, Elsevier was reluctant to meet UC’s key goal: acquiring universal open access to UC research to enable users to view it excluding any charges- as well as to restrain the rising costs associated with for-profit journals. Under Elsevier’s new proposed terms, the publisher would have charged UC authors large publication fees on top of the university’s multi-million dollar subscription, subsequently increasing the cost to the University and greater profits for Elsevier.

Reference link: https://news.berkeley.edu/2019/02/28/why-uc-split-with-publishing-giant-elsevier/

Bristol University pledge a breakthrough in ensuring 5G networks security

New research carried out by the High-Performance Networks Research Group at the University of Bristol’s Smart Internet Lab, has validated a groundbreaking solution for the concerns on security susceptibility of 5G networks which are anticipated to transform the telecommunication industry. The findings were presented on 7 March at a highly prestigious post-deadline paper in the Optical Fibre Communication Conference, San Diego, USA. The proposed solution will enable 5G network operators to offer ultimately secure 5G services while assuring ultra-low-latency and high-bandwidth communications. This is due to the unique blend of quantum and infrastructure virtualization technologies.

Reference link: http://bristol.ac.uk/news/2019/march/quantum-cryptography.html

Africa’s approach to disease research

Researchers of the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) in Ahuja, and its director general, Chikwe Ihekweazu are building strategies to fight infectious diseases that are more often than not outbreaks in Africa. NCDC’s approach to disease research in Africa is self-assured and revolutionary. The agency is assisting to shape the priorities of international scientists who wish to conduct research in Nigeria. Nigeria is vital, as the nation is massive and the country is poked with outbreaks like Ebola that could crash Africa’s economy and spread worldwide. Supporting African-led research is good for science, good for Africa and good for the entire world.

Reference link: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00612-0

CPhI grades Japan in the second position for Pharma

Industry supervisors envisage Japan to be the second fastest growing mature marketplace for solid dose drugs in 2019 followed by the United States. The findings represent a considerable year-on-year improvement in outlook for pharma in Japan with expected growth of solid dose formulations improving by more than 10% with generic drug classes highlighted Significantly, it ranks ahead of all EU nations and Korea. The report concludes that Japan is a ripened country for growth across a number of product classes, but the enduring winners of regulatory changes and innovative R&D remain hard to pick.

Reference Link: https://biospectrumasia.com/news/50/12865/japan-second-fastest-pharma-growth-in-2019-cphi-report.html

Tips for writing a perfect abstract of a conference paper

Academic conferences play a significant role in graduate work. It is an event for researchers to present and discuss their work, crafting a bridge for exchange of information between researchers. But how does a researcher get invited to present their field of research at an academic conference? What makes their work beguiling as well as crisp enough to be chosen for the call? Well, the answer to all is to write and submit an abstract of the research paper. This post will revolve around the finest ways to write a perfect abstract that will help you make your work fit-to-be-seen and praised for.

An abstract is a brief summary of the paper you want to present at the academic conference. The whole work is bundled and potted in an abstract and published as the conference proceedings. The very purpose of an abstract is to review the main points of your paper in such a way to convince conference organizers that your paper has got something important and valuable to add to the conference. Therefore it calls for a to-the-point and clear explanation of the main parts of your research. The general thumb rules to aim for are:

  • Heading should be concise and attention-grabbing. Headings between 30 to 40 characters receive the most citation.
  • Aim for 250-300 words in total, with 20 to 25 words per sentence.
  • Make sure your abstract includes:
  1. Purpose – The abstract need to illustrate the purpose of your work. This is the point which will determine the ticket of your paper in the conference session.
  2. Problem – You need to state the precise problem that you are trying to resolve.
  3. Methods – This includes the approach you took towards solving the problem. You can include how you organized this study and the research that you used.
  4. Results – As a result of completing your study, what did you learn or invent or create?
  5. Conclusions – It includes the larger implication of your anticipated aftermath from your findings.
  • Stick to the word limit and make sure your language and sentence structure are straight forward.
  • Try to summarize your abstract into one sentence. This, in turn, will help you reconstruct the soul of your paper ensuring that you are not including unnecessary information to your submission.
  • Include keyword in your abstract as search engines will use them to locate the paper.
  • End your abstract with implications or recommendations.
  • After you complete your abstract, look it over with a fresh mind. This will help you edit it to improve its effectiveness.

 

Your abstract is like a business card or ‘elevator pitch’. The main point is to catch the attention of conference organizers. You want to be remembered by the people to whom you offer it. Favorably, if possible.

Groundwater is now a ticking time bomb

Future generations will face a ticking environmental “time bomb” as the world’s groundwater systems take years to act in response to the present day impact of climate change. More than two billion people rely on it to drink or irrigate crops. It slowly revives through rainfall but a dry climate or draught threatens the available source of water. Population explosion is also a contributing factor. The planet takes time to adjust to the ever-changing planet. Climate change, Heating of the planet is affecting the natural resource.

Reference: https://www.ndtv.com/science/scientists-warn-of-climate-time-bomb-for-worlds-groundwater-1981163

Editors at Elsevier Journal quit, started a rival open-access journal

The entire board of the Elsevier-owned Journal of Informetrics surrendered on Thursday to protest over high open-access fees, confining access to data and information commercial control of academic work.

Today, a similar group is launching a new fully open-access journal called Quantitative Science Studies. The journal will be for and by the academic community and will be owned by the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI). It will be distributed mutually with MIT Press.

Reference: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/01/14/elsevier-journal-editors-resign-start-rival-open-access-journal

Elsevier authorize the Researchers to access its pay walled journals

The conflict between Elsevier, the world’s biggest publisher of scientific journals, and Germany’s entire university system has dragged on since 2015. However, recently Elsevier has approved continuous access to its paywalled journals for researchers at around 200 German universities and other research institutes that had refused earlier to renew their individual subscriptions. The nationwide deal sought by scientists includes an open-access option, under which all corresponding authors affiliated with German institutions would be allowed to make their papers open to read and share by anyone in the world. This would be a signpost for global efforts to make the results of publicly funded research immediately and freely available to scientists.