Clarivate Analytics and CAS published the joint annual scientific research report

Clarivate Analytics and Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) published their joint annual report ‘Research Fronts 2017’ today. It identified the top 143 areas of scientific research over the past years. This report is the fourth collaborative report from Clarivate Analytics and CAS, which was launched at the joint forum organized at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing.

Reference Link: http://www.knowledgespeak.com/newsArchieveviewdtl.asp?pickUpBatch=3308

2017 Nobel Prize Laureates to be honoured by Wiley for their research works

nobel prize 2017John Wiley and Sons Inc. will acknowledge the laureates awarded with the 2017 Nobel Prize who have published their research works in various scholarly research journals, books, and other reference material published by Wiley on behalf of learned Societies. Laureates namely Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael W. Young, who have been awarded jointly with The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2017 for their studies in the field of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm, are the long-standing authors of Wiley published journals.

Reference Link: http://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/all-corporate-news/wiley-commends-2017-nobel-prize-laureates-their-contributions

Increasing Visibility of Research Paper Using Simple SEO Tricks

What is SEO?

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) refers to the process of ensuring that your manuscript is found by search engines such as Google or PubMed. After all, you’ve spent a lot of time on your research and would want to share your findings with those interested. For this, you need to ensure that readers can find your paper without having to perform difficult searches that could waste their time. Ultimately, you want your findings to have an impact in your field of study and to provide visibility to your research.

Thus, “Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of affecting the visibility of a website or a web page in a web search engine’s unpaid results.” It is the process of maximizing the number of visits made to a particular website by making sure that the website appears high on the list of results returned by a search engine.

The same process is followed by a researcher looking for information related to a particular subject or topic. It is the same when search for papers are done on various abstracting sites like PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar. Papers having the searched words in the title and also in the paper are placed sufficiently high in the result list of the search engine; thus increasing the visibility of the research paper. Now the question that comes to mind is: what do I do to put my paper at the top of the search list of the search engine?

Some useful SEO tips

Keywords play a very important role in effective optimization of the search engine results. Here are few tips to increase the visibility of your paper:

  • Maintain proper keyword density in the paper.
  • Ensure that the title and subtitles contain the keyword.
  • Use descriptive keywords in titles, abstracts, subheadings, captions, tables, and figures.
  • Make your title concise and informative.
  • Using keywords to convey key concepts.
  • Choose keywords that are frequently searched.
  • Insert links based on the keywords to other relevant websites and social media sites.
  • Select a keyword list and use the keywords and their synonyms as often as possible, but remember not to overdo it as this may have a negative impact on the visibility of the paper.

Keywords improve article’s impact factor

Recognition in your discipline not only ensures that your research will have more impact, but it also increases the reliability and validity of the research paper. Articles that can be easily searched have higher citations than other papers. Higher citations also help increase the credibility and visibility of the researchers, therefore increasing their ranking. Google Scholar uses citation information in determining the positioning of papers in the results. This means that the more citations credited to you and your article, the higher up in the ranks you will go and the more “finds” your article will get.

How to choose the best SEO keywords for your paper?

Keywords play a vital role in SEO and therefore should be chosen carefully. There are some tools that can suggest the best possible keywords for your paper or subject. Some of the tools are:

Google Keyword Planner: Finds keywords and search trends relevant to your field of study.

Google Trends: Tracks a particular search term relative to the total search of a related item.

Keyword Tool: Uses common Google searches to provide keyword suggestions.

In today’s generation, most researchers look for papers on the Internet using keywords; therefore choosing the right keywords for better optimization of the search engine is a must. Visibility of your research paper can be increased using simple SEO tricks. You need to keep track of the latest trends in keyword usage and choose your keywords accordingly.

Following these simple SEO guidelines can increase the citations of your work and in turn increase your credibility and visibility in your research field.

Leading German Researchers resign over open-access policy of Elsevier

The latest in the battle over open-access and subscription policies of Elsevier and an association of German libraries, universities, and research institutes is the resignation of five leading German scientists from the editorial board of journals published by Elsevier. The researchers want Elsevier to accept a new payment model that would make all papers authored by Germany-based researchers open access.

Reference Link: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/10/german-researchers-resign-elsevier-journals-push-nationwide-open-access

Research Writer’s Block: What is it and how to overcome?

It is very common in the research fraternity to hear discussions going on about the inability to put down their ideas and thoughts on paper. After the completion of their research work when researchers plan to put down their findings in pen and paper they realize that their hands are paralyzed and thoughts do not come to their mind. Most researchers do not know that such a condition is common and is known as writer’s block.

Writer’s Block

Writer’s block is more of a mental block that the writers experience. There are also some psychological researches that suggest that there is no such thing. But the fact that almost all researchers experience this cannot be denied. One of the main causes of writer’s block is anxiety and this problem can be aggravated if the researcher is not familiar with English, as this is the language that is generally used the world over.

Overcoming Writer’s Block

There are some common strategies followed by experienced researchers to overcome this mental block and complete their research writing within time.

Social Writing: It is a very good idea to join a support or writing group to stay motivated till the end. Social writing reduces the root cause of writer’s block – anxiety, which in turn stimulates writing. Writing while sitting in a group, discussing about the progress, sharing writing goals and achievements helps to understand writing better and increase the flow of creativity. Social writing generates realistic goal-setting and dedicated writing time. With social writing, the need for help or instruction may not be required.

Block Some Time of the Day Exclusively for Writing: Reserve some time of the day for writing, so that you write everyday and avoid the writer’s block setting in again. Morning is considered the best part of the day for writing, the mind is fresh and at its creative best. So, try to write in the morning before checking your email or surf the net to avoid any kind of distraction. The key idea is to write daily, even if it is for 15 minutes then gradually increase the time of writing.

Draft: First write down anything that comes to your mind, without worrying about the grammar and correctness of the sentence. First, jot down your ideas and the content that you want to include in your research paper and then refine it to convert it into your final copy.

So, we can say that the writer’s block is only the creation of the mind, which can be avoided by keeping calm, focused and consistent. All other things will fall into place if the brain is tricked to believe that the writing will be over within time and it will be up to the mark, without any data being missed.

ResearchGate is forced to function in a copyright compliant way

Academic publishers and societies have taken legal action against scientific networking site ResearchGate for copyright violations. A team named Coalition for Responsible Sharing has been formed to restrict ResearchGate downloading and copying articles from published journal articles. The members of this coalition team include the American Chemical Society, Brill, Elsevier, and Wiley and Wolters Kluwer.

Reference Link: https://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2017/10/06/researchgate-publishers-take-formal-steps-force-copyright-compliance/

JAMA Network to launch a full open access medical journal

JAMA Network is in the process of launching a new fully open-access journal containing clinical research across all medical disciplines, JAMA Network Open. It is planned to be launched in early 2018.

Reference Link: https://wire.ama-assn.org/delivering-care/jama-network-launch-fully-open-access-journal

Importance of pre-submission peer review

As the name suggests, pre-submission peer review refers to the review of your research paper before submitting it to a journal. Here, a peer other than the co-authors reviews the paper. This review enhances the quality of the research paper and reduces the load on the peer review system of journals. In other words, this process is a win-win solution for both the authors and the journals.

The below points highlights the importance of pre-submission peer review in the publishing process:

– This process improves your paper by filling in the gaps or fixing errors that might have been previously overlooked.

– It makes your paper more readable and hence, increases the readership of your paper and that of the journal.

– This process gives you the option to choose the person to review your paper, ensuring you get constructive comments from people who know the topic.

– It gives you important feedback from experts in your field of research. Thus, this not only improves your paper but also helps you to make significant contributions to the literature.

However, whether this pre-submission peer review should be implemented or not is still debatable. With increasing workloads and academic pressure, authors often do not feel like wasting time on pre-submission feedback. In addition, they are also reluctant to ask colleagues to do extra work, given that they are always pressed for time. Moreover, with the increasing number of co-authors on scientific papers, most authors do not seek additional external feedback.

But, by adopting pre-submission peer review as an integral part of the publication process, one can substantially reduce the burden on the journal peer review system. Moreover, this also reduces the risk of publishing flawed ideas or inaccurate analyses. peer review

Formatting tables, graphs, and other visuals in your research paper

The format in which you present your research data is very important because it helps you communicate your data to your reader and editors in the best possible way. Although there are many formats in which tables, graphs, and other figures can be presented, you need to choose the best format for your category of data, provided it is within the prescribed guidelines of the journal you are targeting for publication. Before reviewing a paper, many journal editors and reviewers first glance at the layout of the manuscript in terms of its text, tables, figures, and illustrations. Therefore, to make your presentation effective while presenting a large amount of information, a suitable distribution between text, tables, and figures comes handy.

How to use

Sometimes using too much text can get tiresome and confusing, making the reader lose interest or miss data. So encapsulating the information into visual representations can help summarize your analysis. Centralizing the important findings will help readers get the outline without reading the whole manuscript. However, excessive use of visuals can hinder the flow of text and make the whole presentation abrupt. To achieve the highest impact, a proportionate combination of text and visuals always pays off.

Understanding the message

The intension of using a chart, graph, or table is for one of four primary reasons. One illustration might be intended to show a relationship, while another wants to show the composition of a dataset. A third visual could be plotting distribution of data, while a fourth could be comparing various data points. Therefore, you need to understand the objective of the visual before choosing the format; one format may justify one goal but might not fit another.

A relationship is the correlation and connection between the variables of the data presented, like the value of a particular share today versus the value over the year.

A composition is the set of all variables present in the manuscript to make a conclusion, like the total sale of your product, sale online, sale in retail, and direct sales.

A distribution is a representation of all the correlated and non-related data to determine the connection and pattern if any, and the interaction between the variables.

A comparison is the process of finding out the similarities and differences between sets of variables.

Best format for you

Graphics are best for putting your point forward while tables work fine for providing a structure to numerical information. Different formats that work best for various situations are:

  • A bar chart or bar graph shows correlation between distinct categories. One axis shows the particular categories being compared, and the other axis depicts a calculated value. Some bar graphs show bars bunched together in groups of more than one, showing the values of multiple measured variables.
  • Pie charts are generally applied to represent the rate and proportionality of information, and the rate of percentage depicted by every category is marked next to the corresponding portion of the full pie.
  • Line graphs can be used for more than one variable to show the change over time simultaneously.
  • Scatter plots and line graphs are alike, as both use horizontal axes and vertical axes to plot data information points. Scatter plots are used to show the degree to which one variable is affected by another variable, or the connection between them.