The Expectation of Journal Editors

 

The editor may send the paper out for review or may reject it without review. Some scientific journals send out for review less than half of the papers submitted. Journal editors must make a swift decision on a paper’s suitability. It is important to understand what journal editors look for when deciding to send a submission to an academic journal.

What do Journal Editors do?

  • Analyze all manuscripts submitted to their journal.
  • Choose those they believe are appropriate for the journal has enough impact.
  • Send them out for peer review, and take peer reviewer’s recommendations into account when making a final decision on what gets written.
  • Look at the manuscript, the cover letter, abstract, conclusion, and references in deciding to send your manuscript out for review. Pay close attention to these components and understand why they are important will improve the chances of publishing.
  • Weigh the novelty and relevance of a paper against the readership’s perceptions and the journal’s effect.

What Checklists do the  Journal Editors have?

Most important factors that Journal editors consider. Journal editors want to publish high-quality research that their readers would find interesting. It will be readily accepted if it has the following things:

Originality

The need for something unique, something that looks at things differently and asks questions that haven’t been asked before, came up repeatedly in the interviews.

Consistency in research

  • The methods used should be sufficient
  • The conclusions drawn are justified and valid
  • The study should be systematic, well-planned, and well-executed.
  • All works cited should be correctly and carefully referenced.
  • The analysis should be focused on a theoretical context with a discussion of relevant literature.

 

Practice-based relevance

Some papers include a detailed explanation of a specific situation as a case study. Some publications enable practitioners to apply studies, perhaps in collaboration with an educator, to provide complementary perspectives.

Form and argument clarity

There is a certain form of academic writing that isn’t known for its clarity, but many editors value clarity and readability. Clarity and readability are divided into two categories: the language and  the paper’s structure

What are the questions asked by the Journal Editors?

  • Does the Manuscript fall within the scope of the journal?
  • If the Case Report has Ethics Approval?
  • Whether the Study is noble whether its methodology is better than the existing literature?
  • Is the paper carefully prepared and formatted?
  • Is the paper unique and represents cutting-edge research in the area?
  • If the paper Contributes to a thriving science sector?
  • Is the paper meticulously prepared and formatted and contains all of the required sections?
  • If the paper Uses vocabulary that is descriptive and succinct?
  • If the paper Maintains high ethical standards of the Research Process?
  • Does your cover letter provide a persuasive explanation of why the journal should publish your paper?
  • Whether the language used is clear for the readers?

 

Conclusion

The above author guidelines are a piece of general advice but the subject matter and general philosophy of the journal are important.

Peer Review Mechanism

Many of us have often come across the terms “peer review”, “peer-reviewed journal” or “peer-reviewed paper” at some or the other point of time. But, how many of us know what exactly the term “peer review” refers to or what the “peer review process” is all about? Let us discuss this key aspect of the research process.

According to the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), peer review is the critical assessment of manuscripts submitted to journals by experts who are not part of the editorial staff. Peer review, which is also known as refereeing, has become an inevitable part of the quality control process, which determines whether a paper is worth publishing/funding or not.

The origin of peer review often dates back to 18th century Britain. However, it became a key part of the research process only in the second half of the 20th century, triggered by the growth of scholarly research. As the reviewers are specialized in the same field as the author, they are considered to be the author’s peers; hence, it was coined as “peer review”.

Peer Review Process

The author submits the paper to the respective journal. The Journal Editor forwards that paper to experts (reviewers) in the relevant field. These reviewers thoroughly analyze the quality of the paper, validity of the data and methods used, and the accuracy of the results. They provide their judgment on the paper whether: there is scope for improvement, it is ok as it is, or it is not worth publishing. If there are changes to be made in the paper, the reviewers list in their comments the particular areas that have scope for improvement. Then the paper is returned to the Journal Editor who sends it to the author with the appropriate decision: accepted as it is; accepted with revisions; or rejected. Accordingly, the author makes the changes and resubmits to the same journal, or resubmits to another journal.

Types of Peer Review

Peer review can be classified into three types based on the levels of transparency:

Single-blind review: In this case, the author’s identity is known to the reviewers, but not vice versa.

Double-blind review: In this case, the identities of the author and reviewers are hidden from each other.

Open peer review: Here, the author’s and reviewers’ identities are known to each other.

At present, the peer review process is implemented by a majority of scientific journals. It helps to prevent falsified work from being published. Its importance has become such that, most research are not considered to be serious stuff unless they have been validated by peer review. A peer-reviewed paper that is accepted for publication is looked upon as a work of quality. But, this process has its own disadvantages. It is an extremely time-consuming process. The long wait can be extremely frustrating for the researcher and can even jeopardize his academic progress. Moreover, sometimes the element of bias creeps into the peer review process. The reviewers’ judgment might be influenced by their own perception of things, the identity of the author, and at times, even the country of origin of the author.