How to increase citation count for any research paper in 10 different ways

If you are an already published author, you may know how important the number of citations to your research work is. For those who are students or someone just here to know how it all works, read on!

A citation can be simply defined as “a reference to the source of information used in your research”. The amount of papers you publish is important to your career. However, the number of time your work gets cited by others is even more vital as it shows the impact your research has in that particular field. Increasing citations may help in securing funding for your research too as agencies look at combination as well as number citation made in a paper before making decisions on research grants.

Here are 10 things that you should keep in mind in order to be a well-published and frequently cited author:

  1. Cite your own previous work(s)                                                                                        

It is always a good idea to cite your previous work in your current or ongoing paper but it only if your previous work is relevant to your new one. However, it is not advised to cite every work you have ever done to increase your citations. To someone evaluating your work, it may give off a vibe that you may not want them to have.

  1. Select unique keywords                                                                                              

Based on the topic of your research paper, choose a handful of keywords (4-6) that you feel researchers in your field will be using to search for data. Try incorporating them throughout your paper, using them on abstract, headings or subheadings and making sure it is not repetitive.

  1. Keep your name consistent in all your work

This may not seem as interesting but it is also true that keep your name consistent on all your works will help you get the credits that you deserve. Apart from paper, use the same technique on your emails and email signatures, preferably a professional one. If you have a fairly common name, consider getting a research identifier such as an ORCID.

  1. Crosscheck your data before you publish

Aside from reading, re-reading and proofreading your paper, do the same for any data that will help connect a researcher back to you. Incorrect information may make an author drop your citation altogether.

  1. Share part of your information to the public

Platforms like SlideShare, Datacite, Figshare or Wikipedia can help your work reach out more people irrespective of your work available for a fee or open to all. If your paper is open access, publish your pre or post-publication work to a repository.

  1. Socialize and present your paper at conferences

Conferences are the best place for any researcher to understand the current trends in a particular. While this may not dramatically increase citations of your work, it sure will boost more visibility to your work. And besides that, building connections always prove to be helpful in any field of work.

  1. Share and let others know what you’re doing

Use your social media pages to announce what you’re working on especially the interesting tidbits of it without giving away much. Best places would promote would be LinkedIn, Twitter, Reddit, and Facebook Quora and Google+.

  1. Publish a review

Reviews are considered to be one of the highest qualities of research; hence they are cited very often. Since you must have reviewed research work for your own paper, it will be a good idea to post a review as well.

  1. Cite your colleagues to get cited yourself

If you use your colleagues work as citations in your own work, It will not only provide more dimension to your work but it will likely increase their chances of citing your work as well.

  1. Publish your work in a well-renowned journal

Since a majority of researchers would choose a work that is published in one of the top journals in their field, publishing in one of them will boost your visibility even further as researchers would trust your work more.

GE Healthcare collaborates with Saudi university for research

Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University or PSAU which includes Colleges of Medicine, Pharmacy and Applied Medical sciences has hired a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with GE Healthcare Partners to help improve the localized research and authorize Saudi students with the latest innovative technology. GE Healthcare General Manager Daoud Shinwari conveys says, “Through this they aim to cooperate on detailed research into healthcare-specific challenges that will ultimately enhance their overall efficiency.

Reference Link: https://www.consultancy-me.com/news/2132/ge-healthcare-joins-saudi-university-on-research-and-consulting-development

Elsevier Spindle to Open-Access

Elsevier has approved its first “read-and-publish” contract with a national consortium of universities and research institutions in Norway. The Norwegian consortium has employed an agreement that rolls the two costs into one, apart from paying distinctly to avail content behind paywalls and make the particular articles instantly available to the scientific community. This is a big deal because there are many librarians and speakers who trust this model will decrease subscription charges while improving open-access publications.

Reference Link: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/04/24/elsevier-agrees-first-read-and-publish-deal

UB partners with University of the West Indies to form new disease research centers

Members of the Jamaica Health Ministry and the University of the West Indies met with the University of Buffalo (UB) and SUNY faculty, to begin exploring ways to share research and clinical findings to help both countries. The meeting was focused on instituting a new center to study infectious diseases and engage in team science and collaborative research to achieve sustainable health in the Caribbean region. Though the center will be based in Jamaica, it will also have a presence in Buffalo, possibly at the UB Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics & Life Sciences.

Reference Link: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2019/04/012.html

East African Community launches provincial journal

The East African Science and Technology Commission or EASTECO has launched a local journal to promote research in science, technology and innovation. This is a step forward to improve sharing knowledge among the scientific community. The most interesting thing is that this is the first journal of its kind in the region. It is funded by six EAC states. EASTECO’s executive sectary, Gertrude Ngabirano said they aim new information which can be used to address issues disturbing the region. It will also help come up with evidence-based policies.

Reference Link: https://www.newvision.co.ug/new_vision/news/1497716/eac-launch-regional-science-journal-promote-research-innovation

Africa’s approach to disease research

Researchers of the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) in Ahuja, and its director general, Chikwe Ihekweazu are building strategies to fight infectious diseases that are more often than not outbreaks in Africa. NCDC’s approach to disease research in Africa is self-assured and revolutionary. The agency is assisting to shape the priorities of international scientists who wish to conduct research in Nigeria. Nigeria is vital, as the nation is massive and the country is poked with outbreaks like Ebola that could crash Africa’s economy and spread worldwide. Supporting African-led research is good for science, good for Africa and good for the entire world.

Reference link: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00612-0

Journal for “controversial ideas” to be launched next year

A “controversial ideas” journal where researchers can publish articles under pseudonyms will be launched next year by an Oxford University academic. The new journal is a response to a rise in researchers being criticised and silenced by those who disagree with them, according to Jeff McMahan, a professor of moral philosophy at Oxford.

Reference Link: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2018/11/12/controversial-ideas-journal-academics-can-publish-pseudonyms/

AI and scientific literature work in sync

When scholars choose a topic to work on their research, they need more sources or materials to review literature and add more value to their findings. According to Canadian science publishing’s article from last year, 2.5 million research papers are published annually while another unidentified source suggests that new researches are published around the world; approximately 1 million each year! Which is equal to one every 30 seconds. With the overload of new papers in each field and more growing every year it is practically impossible for scholars to keep with the information that is put out in each paper. Christian Berger’s team from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, found a staggering number of papers on the subject; more than 10,000 in the same subject. Fortunately, the team had the support of an AI system, a writing investigation tool called Iris.ai.

Iris.ai is an AI, a tool developed for scholars to make writing research papers easier. It is a Berlin-based company that claims to save 90% of time with 85% precision of data matching, has more than 70 m open access papers. Iris.ai is programmed to learn about the topic provided and perform an elaborate frequency analysis over the text. Then it read the words for which it needs to find results and additional material that could be helpful for the paper. It uses a 500-word description of the researcher’s issue, or the link of their paper and the AI restores a guide to thousands of coordinating reports. As the website suggests, it is a scientific writing assistant.

According to Berger, it was “a quick and nevertheless precise overview of what should be relevant to a certain research question”. Iris.ai is one among many of the new AI-based tools offering targeted results of the knowledge landscape. One such tool is called Semantic Scholar, produced by the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Seattle, Washington, and Microsoft Academic.

Although every instrument is different from each other and gives different output, they all provide researchers with a different look at the scientific literature than conventional tools such as PubMed and Google Scholar. Semantic Scholar is a browser-based search tool that mimics the engines like Google and it is free. But it is more informative than Google Scholar in terms of specific results required by researchers. Doug Raymond, Semantic Scholar’s general manager, says that one million individuals utilize their service every month. It uses natural language processing or NLP to extract data while building connections to determine if the information is relevant and reputable or not.

Artificial intelligence is saving a lot of time and making it easier and quicker to automate some procedures. In the academic publishing industry, the Al-based innovations are being produced and implemented to help both authors and publishers for peer reviews, searching published content, detecting plagiarism, and identifying data fabrication. AI could be costly, but it can accelerate a researchers’ access to new fields. More and more such AI tools are being developed to cater to various requisites of writing a paper, such as filtering topics for relevance, keyword search, etc.

Experts who need more assistance for their specific concerns might consider free Al­ tool such as Microsoft Academic or Semantic Scholar. While AI is easing so many burdens and saving time for a researcher, let’s not forget that it is still machine intelligence and may require human intervention here and there to make a paper more presentable and precise.

Wiley and Hindawi increase their open access publishing partnership

With Open Access turning into the shared vision of various governments worldwide and a specific concentration inside some European research funders, this extended joint effort permits both Wiley and Hindawi to help the continuous improvement of top-notch open access titles and giving creators extra choices for where and how to publish. This collaboration is an extraordinary case of how Open Access is an intense and powerful driving force of the Open Science landscape, supporting an open and energizing worldwide space of sharing and associating the effect of research for the future generations.

Reference link: http://www.stm-publishing.com/wiley-and-hindawi-expand-open-access-publishing-collaboration/