Bristol University pledge a breakthrough in ensuring 5G networks security

New research carried out by the High-Performance Networks Research Group at the University of Bristol’s Smart Internet Lab, has validated a groundbreaking solution for the concerns on security susceptibility of 5G networks which are anticipated to transform the telecommunication industry. The findings were presented on 7 March at a highly prestigious post-deadline paper in the Optical Fibre Communication Conference, San Diego, USA. The proposed solution will enable 5G network operators to offer ultimately secure 5G services while assuring ultra-low-latency and high-bandwidth communications. This is due to the unique blend of quantum and infrastructure virtualization technologies.

Reference link: http://bristol.ac.uk/news/2019/march/quantum-cryptography.html

Africa’s approach to disease research

Researchers of the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) in Ahuja, and its director general, Chikwe Ihekweazu are building strategies to fight infectious diseases that are more often than not outbreaks in Africa. NCDC’s approach to disease research in Africa is self-assured and revolutionary. The agency is assisting to shape the priorities of international scientists who wish to conduct research in Nigeria. Nigeria is vital, as the nation is massive and the country is poked with outbreaks like Ebola that could crash Africa’s economy and spread worldwide. Supporting African-led research is good for science, good for Africa and good for the entire world.

Reference link: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00612-0

CPhI grades Japan in the second position for Pharma

Industry supervisors envisage Japan to be the second fastest growing mature marketplace for solid dose drugs in 2019 followed by the United States. The findings represent a considerable year-on-year improvement in outlook for pharma in Japan with expected growth of solid dose formulations improving by more than 10% with generic drug classes highlighted Significantly, it ranks ahead of all EU nations and Korea. The report concludes that Japan is a ripened country for growth across a number of product classes, but the enduring winners of regulatory changes and innovative R&D remain hard to pick.

Reference Link: https://biospectrumasia.com/news/50/12865/japan-second-fastest-pharma-growth-in-2019-cphi-report.html

Groundwater is now a ticking time bomb

Future generations will face a ticking environmental “time bomb” as the world’s groundwater systems take years to act in response to the present day impact of climate change. More than two billion people rely on it to drink or irrigate crops. It slowly revives through rainfall but a dry climate or draught threatens the available source of water. Population explosion is also a contributing factor. The planet takes time to adjust to the ever-changing planet. Climate change, Heating of the planet is affecting the natural resource.

Reference: https://www.ndtv.com/science/scientists-warn-of-climate-time-bomb-for-worlds-groundwater-1981163

Editors at Elsevier Journal quit, started a rival open-access journal

The entire board of the Elsevier-owned Journal of Informetrics surrendered on Thursday to protest over high open-access fees, confining access to data and information commercial control of academic work.

Today, a similar group is launching a new fully open-access journal called Quantitative Science Studies. The journal will be for and by the academic community and will be owned by the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI). It will be distributed mutually with MIT Press.

Reference: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/01/14/elsevier-journal-editors-resign-start-rival-open-access-journal

Elsevier authorize the Researchers to access its pay walled journals

The conflict between Elsevier, the world’s biggest publisher of scientific journals, and Germany’s entire university system has dragged on since 2015. However, recently Elsevier has approved continuous access to its paywalled journals for researchers at around 200 German universities and other research institutes that had refused earlier to renew their individual subscriptions. The nationwide deal sought by scientists includes an open-access option, under which all corresponding authors affiliated with German institutions would be allowed to make their papers open to read and share by anyone in the world. This would be a signpost for global efforts to make the results of publicly funded research immediately and freely available to scientists.

Cambridge University Press accepts Open Access agreement

Cambridge University Press has reached a major Open Access contract with higher education and research institutions in Sweden. The three-year ‘read and publish’ deal has agreed with Bibsam – an association of 85 higher education and research institutions, led by the National Library of Sweden. It indicates that the authors from institutions affiliated to Bibsam can publish their publicly-financed research articles in the Press’s hybrid and fully Open Access journals. It also gives Bibsam members full access to the Press’ full collection of nearly 400 journals from 1 January 2019.

Reference:http://www.stm-publishing.com/cambridge-university-press-signs-major-open-access-deal-in-sweden/

AI peer reviewers smoothen the publishing grind

Peer review by artificial intelligence (AI) is promising to improve the process, enhance the quality of published papers — and save reviewers time. A handful of academic publishers are driving AI tools to do anything from selecting reviewers to checking statistics and summarizing a paper’s findings. In June, software called StatReviewer adopted by Aries Systems verifies the statistics and methods used in the manuscripts. ScholarOne, another peer-review platform is teaming up with UNSILO of Aarhus, Denmark, which uses natural language processing and machine learning to analyze manuscripts. UNSILO automatically pulls out key concepts to summarize what the paper is about. These tools can make sure a manuscript is up to scratch, but in no way are they replacing what a reviewer would do in terms of evaluation.

Reference Link : https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-07245-9

Journal for “controversial ideas” to be launched next year

A “controversial ideas” journal where researchers can publish articles under pseudonyms will be launched next year by an Oxford University academic. The new journal is a response to a rise in researchers being criticised and silenced by those who disagree with them, according to Jeff McMahan, a professor of moral philosophy at Oxford.

Reference Link: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2018/11/12/controversial-ideas-journal-academics-can-publish-pseudonyms/

Diversified journal guidelines confuse Scientists

A global study of 7000 researchers suggests that unclear publishing policies place an extra burden on scientists who don’t speak English as their first language. A significant proportion of respondents revealed that preparing manuscripts for English-language journals is the most challenging step in the publication process. A considerable percentage even did not have a solid understanding of some aspects of publication ethics or were not familiar with standard ethics-related guidelines and bodies. The publishing industry should work on how to minimize the additional burden on authors.