Future Science Group opens a new journal – Future Drug Discovery

Future Drug Discovery is a peer-reviewed, open access journal covering the latest breakthrough science in drug discovery, research & development. Future Drug Discovery aims to harness high failure rates, presenting new advances and discussing their applications and translation in an openly accessible format, and providing a forum for discussing the field at large. It will be a quarterly publication publishing case histories, methodologies, original research, reviews and opinion articles covering the entire drug discovery pipeline, plus topics of interest to the drug discovery community. A comprehensive list of topics can be found at the journal webpage.

Reference Link: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-03/fsg-fsg032619.php

Cambridge University Press accepts Open Access agreement

Cambridge University Press has reached a major Open Access contract with higher education and research institutions in Sweden. The three-year ‘read and publish’ deal has agreed with Bibsam – an association of 85 higher education and research institutions, led by the National Library of Sweden. It indicates that the authors from institutions affiliated to Bibsam can publish their publicly-financed research articles in the Press’s hybrid and fully Open Access journals. It also gives Bibsam members full access to the Press’ full collection of nearly 400 journals from 1 January 2019.

Reference:http://www.stm-publishing.com/cambridge-university-press-signs-major-open-access-deal-in-sweden/

Asking journalists’ questions

Journalists’ questions begin with what is known as the ‘5W’s and 1H’ interrogatives:

  • Who?
  • What?
  • Where?
  • Why?
  • When?
  • How?

You can approach your task by listing as many journalists’ questions about your topic as you can. Questioning encourages you to look at a topic from many different perspectives, and may help you to narrow the issue that you are investigating. Journalists’ questions are especially useful when your task involves much factual information, because they actually force you to answer them by providing specifics rather than open-ended or ambiguous statements.

Catch Your Typos

Nobody likes typos. They look like misspellings, only it’s usually obvious they are mere oversights, the result of tapping the wrong key. It happens a lot when writers rush, and it happens a lot less when writers proofread their work before submitting or publishing. Most writers are going to miss a typo every now and then. Nobody’s perfect. However, when you read a writer’s work regularly and typos are just something you expect every time, that’s a sign of poor or nonexistent proofreading.