Noun – English editing.

A noun is a word that names a person, animal, or thing. Common nouns name persons, animals, or things of which there is not just one example, (bridge, girl, sugar, unhappiness), whereas proper nouns name specific people, places, events, institutions, magazines, books, plays, and so forth, and are written with initial capital letters(Billy, Asia, Easter, Hamlet). Concrete nouns refer to physical things and living beings (bread, woman), and abstract noun to concepts (greed, unhelpfulness). Some nouns are concrete and abstract in different meanings, e.g. cheek is concrete when it refers to a part of the face and abstract when it means ‘impertinence’.
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Nonplussed – English editing.

In standard use nonplussed means ‘surprised and confused’, as in she was nonplussed at his eagerness to help out. In North America, English a new use has developed in recent years meaning ‘unperturbed’- more or less the opposite of its traditional meaning-as in he was clearly trying to appear nonplussed. Although the use is common it is not yet considered standard. Similarly, many people would not consider spelling this word with a hyphen, nonplussed, to be good style.
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None – English editing

Some language purists maintain that none can take a singular verb, never a plural one:none of them is coming tonight rather than none of them are coming tonight. There is little historical or grammatical justification for this view. None comes from Old English nan meaning ‘not one’ and has been used for around a thousand years with both a singular and a plural verb, depending on the context and the emphasis needed.
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Onto – English editing.

The preposition onto meaning ‘to a position on the surface of’, as in they fell off their stools onto the rough stone floor , has been widely written as one word(instead of on to)since the early 18th century. Some people, however , still do not wholly accept it as part of the standard English language. (unlike into, for example). In US English, onto is more or less the standard form and this is likely to become the case in British English before long.
Because of the increasing tendancy to write the two words as one,it is important to remember never to write onto as one wordwhen it means ‘onwards and towards’, as in let’s go on to the next point.
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