SENTENCES AND PHRASES

The first step to develop your writing style is to focus on sentences and phrases. The more you practice with different sentences and phrases, the more you improve and enhance your writing style.

Let us again understand the grammatical terminologies of a sentence. A sentence can be briefly defined as a group of words that consists of a subject (i.e., someone or something that does an action) and a verb (the action). The least group of words is called a clause. Some sentences may also contain an object (the thing or person acted upon).

The report recommended changes.
Subject Verb Object

If the word group has no subject or no verb, but its still makes some basic sense, then it is a phrase. It is a fragment and not a complete sentence, and is often used to create colorful and imagistic effects. These can be used in creative writing, but try to avoid using them in formal or specialist styles.

 

Phrase: While crossing the river.

Sentence: While crossing the river, he slipped on the wet stepping stones.

Make sure you consider the following qualities while writing complete sentences:

1. A verb that shows time: Include something that happens or is described in the past, present, or future. If the group of words has no verb, then it is a fragment. Even if it contains a verb but no tense, it fails to qualify as a complete sentence. Remember, gerunds (-ing) and infinitives (-to do) are not tensed verbs and can be used as nouns or participles.

Fragment: The committee considering the proposal.

Sentence: The committee considered the proposal.

Sentence: The committee considers the proposal.

Sentence: The committee will consider the proposal.

2. The absence of a subordinating word: Your group of words fails to be a complete sentence if any one of the following words or phrases is placed in front of it:

after if until
although in case when
as provided that whenever
as if since whereas
as though so that whether
because that which
before unless while

Consider the following example:

While common law has long implied that there is a requirement for mutual respect and fair dealings in the employment relationship.

 

The while at the beginning of the sentence implies that there is a second part to this sentence, which contrasts with the information given in the first. Without this second part, the sentence is not complete. To correct this problem, either put a comma after relationship and add another clause, or take away while.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Writing Research Papers

Every researcher wants to submit an excellent research paper at the termination of their research. Your piece of writing is the only medium that conveys your hard work to the readers. Whether you write an abstract, a research paper, research proposals or thesis, your ways of presenting the data and your writing style all together create a holistic picture of you. Owing to the utter significance of a research paper, here are some tips that can ease the complicated process of writing.

The following is a list of Do’s and Don’ts┬áto remember as you begin to pen down your work:
The Do’s:

  1. Communicate your work clearly and precisely. Remember you are presenting a novel work done; you don’t have to write stories.
  2. Spotlight the ideas and methodologies involved. Discuss specific reasons to justify your research.
  3. Your innovative ideas and methodologies can be followed by future researchers, therefore, doubly verify the accuracy and correctness of the data you present.
  4. Your presented materials should give a thorough conception of the topic and all its aspects.
  5. Refer diverse sources of research for trustworthy and most up-to-date information.
  6. Do scrutinize your research stuff and information for reliability and present it with ample analysis and logic to show how it conveys and supports your research.
  7. Provide solid evidences and sufficient supporting arguments to reinforce your findings.
  8. Fill your paper with scientific terminologies. Write your paper with only enough detail about the research work.
  9. Maintain a track of the bibliography and references. Sort data by source or mark your notes so as to remember where individual facts came from.
  10. Proof read the paper several times. Do not hesitate to take help of your friends/peers/colleagues/professional editors in proof reading and fine tuning the paper.

And the Don’ts:

  1. Do not misrepresent yourself. Be honest to the readers.
  2. Don’t include anything that doesn’t answer the questions. It won’t lead to any new conclusion about your work.
  3. Don’t lengthen your paper unnecessarily. Relevant and to the point data is sufficient to frame your work and make your point.
  4. Don’t reveal incomplete or absurd reasons for doing the research.
  5. Don’t exceed the recommended word limits. This gives an impression that you don’t know how to follow guidelines, manage within limitations or systematize your findings.
  6. Don’t make too many generalizations. A paper full of overviews gives an impression that you do not have anything to say.
  7. Don’t write in a vacuum. Make sure that each of your findings support the cause.
  8. Don’t forget to reference any supporting material or related research done by other prominent researchers’ it augments and complements the research paper.
  9. Don’t cite Wikipedia. ┬áRather find an absolutely reliable source for your citations.
  10. Don’t plagiarize and always proof read your work before submission.