Open Access Publication and its Significance

Hundreds and thousands of articles are published every year irrespective of their category and subject in about 25,000 journals worldwide. Published research works and articles help in laying a foundation for future progress in medicine and healthcare developments. This aim of publicizing the new successful researches is possible when the articles published in journals are accessed by the people without any restrictions. The open access can help in disseminating knowledge by promoting the innovations and the solutions to the prevailing incurable problems in medicine and healthcare.

The readership of the open access journals are more in comparison to the subscription mode of publication. This mode of publication increases the number of readers and significantly increases the citations per article rate.

The more the research articles are freely accessible, the more are its utilizations by the health care providers, clinicians, researchers and students along with the public. This free access to the articles is technically termed as Open Access Publication. This mode of publication make research works more useful by allowing an easy access to it for study or further analyzation and creating a chance for further researches, manipulation and mining of the study/research.

Generally, the research works target those health problems which lack solutions. Even if any researcher or medicine practitioner addresses the proposed solutions to such incurable health problems after conducting numerous researches for it, the result or the findings remains unapproachable by the public and other health care practitioners due to the restrictions on the access of the article by the journals by the subscription mode of publication. One who can subscribe the journal or pay for the article can only access those valuable inventions done in the field of medicine and health care.

Nowadays, the prices of the subscription mode are no longer reasonable for a new researcher, academician or student. Some university libraries pay large amount of fees for subscribing to these journals in order to make their students have an easy access to the journal articles on-line. In some countries, the journal subscription prices are so high that the institutions are incapable of accessing those published up-to-date research articles.

Keeping all these points in mind, some journals have shifted to only open access mode of publications, i.e., they have become Open Access Journal. Such journals make their articles available for free through charging for the publication services before publication, rather than after publication through subscriptions. This initiative might now put an impact of the economic aspects of the research work. As the open access publication charges can be included in research funding, the charge for access is handled by the research funder and not the institute’s library.

We hope this detailed portrayal of the open access publication will be a guide for understanding its impact on the field of research and findings.

Academic Journals

Academic journals are also known as periodicals. They usually include the research works of a variety of people specialising in diverse areas of academics. Academic journals are not written by every regular author, but only by professionals who are approved to share their opinions, knowledge and researches with a huge community consisting of educationists, professors and students. The reason behind writing in academic journals is to enhance the information in universal and in explicit sense, as well as to share the information with students and other experts belonging to the same field or discipline.

The present article on “Academic Journals” gives detailed information about academic journals and some basic tips as guidance while writing for academic journals.

Types of Academic Journals

Academic journal writing differs on the basis of its subject matter. In a broader sense, academic journals can be characterised under the following types.

  • Art journals
  • Arts and Education
  • Biological Sciences
  • Business Journals
  • Legal Studies
  • Medical Sciences
  • Physical Sciences
  • Research Journals
  • Scholarly Journals
  • Science Journals
  • Social Sciences

Tips for Academic Journals Writing

In order to produce a remarkable piece of content, which is suitable for publishing, it is necessary to follow specific kinds of formats and procedures.

  • Ensure to write significant and relevant points and sentences. Avoid unnecessary and repetitive information. Pay extra attention while selecting words and phrases.
  • Try to maintain a formal tone in your writing. Besides, ensure that the sentences are composed from the viewpoint of a third party.
  • Remember that the readers of your articles are people from your own field or discipline. Thus, it is typical to assume that they already possess basic knowledge about what you will be writing. Consequently, this eliminates the need of explaining the information in much detail.
  • Ensure to format and organise your written matter into various segments so that the article looks well-arranged and easy to comprehend.
  • Although not mandatory, it is always beneficial to go through the process of peer review. By the help of this process, one or more professionals belonging to your specific field will read and analyse your written material and provide suggestions for improvement.
  • After finishing writing the article, ensure to revise and proofread it. Read it again and again to check and eliminate any kind of mistake in spellings, punctuation, grammar, concepts, and/or reasoning.

Writing for academic journals is not that tough if taken proper steps and assistance. As these journals are usually written by professionals, there are fewer chances of errors, but one can never be too sure about this. Hence, it is advised to follow some basic tips and guidelines while writing your articles for academic journals in order to avoid any kind of mistake or error.

Secondary Research

Commonly known as desk research also, secondary research is the most common research method in use today. It is based on the findings of other peoples research and involves processing that collected data. Researchers may consult previous studies and findings such as reports, press articles and previous market research projects, which are relevant to their own topic so as to arrive at a conclusion. This information can be gathered from books, reports or the Internet.

Secondary data sources may be either qualitative (descriptive) or quantitative (numerical).  Qualitative data sources include internet, magazines, newspapers, books, journal articles, diaries, interview transcripts, encyclopedias, dictionaries, reviews, etc., and quantitative sources include surveys and statistics, which are available in the public records office or the national archives. Other types of secondary sources are reference materials, books, CDs, videotapes, and television shows. Most research papers are based on secondary sources as they build up on these previous research or studies.

 

SOURCES OF SECONDARY DATA

Official Statistics: These are collected by governments and their various agencies, bureaus, and departments. These statistics can be useful to researchers because they are easily obtainable and comprehensive source of information covers long time periods.

Technical Reports: These are accounts of work done on research projects. They provide research results to colleagues, research institutions, governments, and other interested researchers.

Scholarly Journals: These contain reports of original research or experiments written by experts in specific fields.

Literature Review Articles: These assemble and review the original research. Written by field experts, review articles discuss and list all the relevant publications from which the information is derived.

Reference Books: Reference books provide specific facts or a summary of a topic. Handbooks, manuals, encyclopedias, and dictionaries are included in this category.

The main advantage of secondary research compared to primary research is its relatively low expense and easy availability. Problems with using secondary data include the possibility of bias (biographies), poor validity (trying to make the data to fit to our research when it was collected for a different purpose), incomplete information (some sites offer free portions of a research and then charge expensive fees for the full reports), outdated information (an out-of-date market survey may be irrelevant to the current market scenario), and low quality (statistics, which might not have been verified). These can all return inaccurate results.